A reflection on the 75th anniversary of D-Day

The 75th anniversary of D-Day offers a chance to reflect on the many heroes who have fought for freedom here in the United States of America. Brave men and women stood up for what they believed and valued in the face of adversity, contention, and war.

As we honor these men and women, we’d like to highlight the stories of other men and women, both in the armed forces and just ordinary citizens, who have stood up for what they believed in. Take a look at our list below.

Invisible Heroes

Jerry Borrowman


Invisible Heroes of World War II, documents ten fascinating true stories of a diverse group of soldiers and noncombatants from all over the world, including African Americans, women, and Native Americans who worked and fought to keep the world safe from tyranny and oppression. Some were frontline soldiers and spies, while others were engineers, industry workers, or war correspondents and photographers. Without much fanfare, these heroes made noteworthy contributions to the war effort. Some even gave their lives for freedom and liberty. All served with valor and distinction, and their names should never be forgotten.

  • CONTENTS
    Pat Patton: Abandoned at Bataan

  • Nancy Wake: The White Mouse of the French Resistance

  • Joseph Hyalmar Anderson: Missing in Action

  • Joseph Medicine Crow: The Last War Chief

  • Dickey Chapelle: American Journalist

  • Navajo Code Talkers: Heroes of the Pacific War

  • The Purple Heart Battalion: Rescuing the Texas 1st

  • Combat Engineers: Builders and Soldiers

  • African Americans at War: Heroes Despite Prejudice

  • Rosie the Riveter: Women in the War Industries

 

Compassionate Soldier

Jerry Borrowman

Compassionate Soldier illuminates fascinating yet largely unknown stories of men and women whose humanity led them to perform courageous acts of mercy and compassion amid the chaos and carnage of war. Arranged by war from the American Revolution to the Iraq War and global in perspective, it features extraordinary stories of grace under fire from valiant soldiers and noncombatants who rose above the inhumanity of lethal conflict and chose compassion, even knowing their actions could put their lives and liberty at risk.

Included are the stories of Patrick Ferguson, a British officer during the American Revolution who had the chance to kill George Washington but refused to shoot a man in the back; Richard Kirkland, a Confederate soldier during the Civil War who took water to wounded Union soldiers during the battle of Fredericksburg; and Oswald Boelcke, a German WWI flying ace who was one of the most influential tacticians of early air combat and was known for making sure the airmen he shot down made it to the ground alive.

These and other inspirational stories illustrate that even in the midst of the unspeakable horrors of war, acts of kindness, mercy, compassion, and humanity can prevail and, in doing so, expand our conventional thinking of honor and battlefield glory.

 

Deep Conviction

Steven T. Collis

Deep Conviction features four ordinary Americans who put their reputations and livelihoods at risk as they fought to protect their first amendment right to live their personal beliefs. These individuals all share a similar conviction and determination to fight for religious freedom for all.

In 1813, a Catholic priest in New York City faced prison after a grand jury subpoenaed him for refusing to divulge the identity of a jewelry thief who admitted to the crime during the sacrament of confession.

In 1959, an atheist in Maryland was forced to choose between his job and his beliefs when the state required him, as part of the hiring process, to sign an oath that said he believed in God. The United States Supreme Court would decide his fate.

In 1989, a Klamath Indian man walked into the highest court of our nation to fight for the right to practice the central sacrament of the Native American Church after the state of Oregon had declared it illegal.

And, finally, in 2017, a Christian baker and a gay couple took their cases to the United States Supreme Court after the baker declined to create a custom wedding cake to celebrate the couple’s same-sex marriage, fearing it would violate his duty to God.

Chosen for their universality and for the broad principles they represent, these true stories reflect the diversity of beliefs in the United States, the conflicts between religious freedom and other interests, the perils individuals face when their right to live their beliefs is threatened, and the genius of America’s promise of religious liberty for all.

 

Saints and Soldiers is a dramatic, intense and heroic WWII film about members of the Greatest Generation struggling to be both good men and good soldiers.

In-mid December 1944, while Hitler's Army blitzkriegs through the Ardennes Forest in Belgium. American sharpshooter Corporal Nathan Greer, known as Deacon, finds himself held captive with over one hundred other American Soldiers in a snow covered-field.

As panic and confusion ensue the German soldiers open fire on the American Prisoners, in the historical event now known as the Malmedy Massacre. Greer, his friend Gordon Gunderson and a handful of others escape the massacre by hiding in the nearby woods.

The small band of soldiers come across a stranded British intelligence officer with valuable information to be delivered to the Allied forces, further upping the stakes of their already dangerous situation.

With few weapons, no food and strained camaraderie, this tiny band must take on the unforgiving winter to fight their way back to Allied occupied territory.

In addition to winning 14 Best Picture Awards at film festivals nationwide, critics and audiences have showered Saints and Soldiers with praise, making it one of the most acclaimed films of 2004.

 
 

Fire and Steel Series

Gerald N. Lund

The strongest steel is forged in the hottest flames. From master storyteller Gerald N. Lund comes a new blockbuster series chronicling the lives of two families who will face some of the most turbulent times in history as they are tried to their very cores. Will they be tempered and strengthened by the hammering blows, will they bend to the point of breaking, or will they completely shatter?

 
Chelsea Oldroyd